The US is poised to require foreign aircraft-repair shops to test workers for drugs and alcohol


The federal government will propose to require drug and alcohol testing for employees of foreign aircraft-repair shops outside the United States

ByThe Associated Press

December 6, 2023, 11:09 AM

FILE - A Federal Aviation Administration sign hangs in the tower at John F. Kennedy International Airport, March 16, 2017, in New York. The federal government will propose to require drug and alcohol testing for employees of foreign aircraft-repair shops outside the United States. That would bring foreign repair shops under the same rules that apply to workers in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2023 that it will publish its proposal this week and allow 60 days for public comment. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

FILE – A Federal Aviation Administration sign hangs in the tower at John F. Kennedy International Airport, March 16, 2017, in New York. The federal government will propose to require drug and alcohol testing for employees of foreign aircraft-repair shops outside the United States. That would bring foreign repair shops under the same rules that apply to workers in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2023 that it will publish its proposal this week and allow 60 days for public comment. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Federal Aviation Administration proposed Wednesday to require drug and alcohol testing for employees of aircraft-repair shops in other countries.

If the FAA proposal becomes final, foreign shops that perform certain safety-related work on planes would have to electronically transmit results of employee tests to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The FAA said its proposal would affect nearly 1,000 repair shops in 65 countries.

Unions representing U.S. aircraft mechanics have long pushed for more scrutiny of foreign shops, calling it a safety issue, but the FAA resisted. Drug-testing rules that date to the 1980s do not cover situations in which mandatory testing would violate the laws or policies of another country.

On Wednesday, however, the agency said that raising the standards on foreign shops would be an important safety measure because few countries require drug and alcohol testing of aircraft-maintenance workers.

The FAA will publish its proposed rule in the Federal Register on Thursday and allow 60 days for anyone to submit comments.



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