ÆTHER/MASS Taps 3 Collaborators for 4 New Collectibles


Davy Grosemans’ ÆTHER/MASS design studio exists to create unique, experimental collaborations between designers and makers who use materials and production techniques with innovation. Akin to their other pieces, these four new objects being released today at the Collectible fair in Brussels buck trends and logic in favor of interesting works with exceptional attention to detail and finishing. By restricting each collaborative project to an edition of 12, Grosemans is afforded the focus to create experimental, one-of-a-kind, expressive works.

“Working with skilled craftsmen is the guiding principle in my work. Despite the popularity of crafts and the involvement of many young ‘makers’ working with their hands, authentic craftsmen are scarce,” Grosemans shares. “I’m talking about individuals who have an in-depth knowledge of their materials and can deliver exceptionally high quality. Personally, I aim to think broadly, sample various aspects, and experiment across different disciplines initially. Subsequently, I can delve deeper into the matter.”

Exposure, Aperture, Forge, and Beam each hold deeper meaning, more than can be seen in their minimalistic designs. Alongside a wooden cabinet, the new collection features first time collaborations between ÆTHER/MASS and three workshops who specialize in metal: aluminum, wrought iron, and mirror-polished stainless steel. You’ll find that each craftsman uses the metals’ properties to their favor in various ways that put its intrinsic beauty front and center.

tall wood cabinet

Exposure

CasimirAteliers has previously worked with ÆTHER/MASS, with the Exposure cabinet the fruit of their continued collaborative efforts. Master woodworkers who specialize in solid wood furniture, CasimirAteliers’ cabinet is as complex in design as it is simple in aesthetic. The doors, well, aren’t doors at all. Rather, they’re seamlessly integrated into the cabinet’s structure, staying open and losing their expected function of closing to conceal. Are they lending an ear or are thy threatening to tell your secrets? You decide.

tall wood cabinet

Exposure

tall wood cabinet

Exposure

detail of tall wood cabinet

Exposure

detail of tall wood cabinet

Exposure

square metal coffee table with tabletop perforations

Aperture

The Aperture table, created in collaboration with the artisans of Alton, subtracts material to generate detail in its solid 30mm-thick aluminum slab rather than adding more. It remains fully functional, with the table’s captivating surface punctuated with a pattern of 32 circular perforations removed using water jets. The aluminum byproduct doesn’t go to waste – it’s stacked to become Aperture’s table legs.

square metal coffee table with tabletop perforations

Aperture

square metal coffee table with tabletop perforations

Aperture

detail of square metal coffee table with tabletop perforations

Aperture

detail of square metal coffee table with tabletop perforations

Aperture

metal candelabra

Forge

Dujardyn’s master blacksmiths meld the physical strength of steel with the power of fire to bring Forge to life. The refined candelabra with a tactile surface reveals its own process of creation with clear signs of human touch. The four candles in a broad placement – literally and figuratively – symbolize the fire from which the artifact itself is forged.

metal candelabra

Forge

illuminated metal candelabra

Forge

metal candelabra

Forge

detail of metal candelabra

Forge

slim metal floor lamp

Beam

Another collaboration with Alton, the Beam Lamp slices through space with its mirror-polished stainless steel blade and arching glow in its wake. The lamp’s base, which is reminiscent of a serif, gives Beam a sculptural form that’s as valuable as its utility. This unconventionality is what makes Beam Lamp stand out from most others, an unexpected but welcome visual aesthetic.

slim metal floor lamp

Beam

detail of slim metal floor lamp

Beam

detail of slim metal floor lamp

Beam

illuminated slim metal floor lamp

Beam

To learn more about the four latest collaborative pieces from ÆTHER/MASS, visit aethermass.com.

Photography by Jean Van Cleemput.





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